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William Heath Robinson
William Heath Robinson (1872-1944)

Heath Robinson is a household name, and a byword for a design or construction that is ‘ingeniously or ridiculously over-complicated’ (as defined by The New Oxford Dictionary of English, 1998, page 848). Yet, he was also a highly distinctive and versatile illustrator, whose work could touch at one extreme the romantic watercolours of a Dulac or Rackham, at another the sinister grotesqueries of a Peake, and at yet another the eccentricities of an Emett.

William Heath Robinson was born on 31 May 1872 in Islington, North London, the third son of Thomas Robinson, chief staff artist of the Penny Illustrated Paper . In the hope of becoming a landscape painter, he studied at Islington School of Art and the Royal Academy Schools, but soon followed his brothers, Charles and Tom, into the more secure profession of illustration. He contributed to periodicals from 1896 and, in the following year, began to illustrate books. He established his position in 1902, marking his individuality with illustrations to his own book, The Adventures of Uncle Lubin , and ensuring his financial stability by making his first drawings for advertising. In this first phase, he worked almost exclusively in black and white, fully demonstrating his mastery of monochrome in The Works of Francis Rabelais . This appeared in 1904, just as Grant Richards, his main patron and the book’s publisher, became bankrupt. However, he was able to work with other publishers, developing his use of colour in order to produce true gift books; these began with Twelfth Night (Hodder, 1908), and included his own story, Bill the Minder (Constable, 1912), and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Constable, 1914).

Though Robinson competed with others in the field of the gift book, he remained the unparalleled practitioner of the comic image. He produced an increasing number of humorous drawings for magazines and, from the First World War, was acknowledged the most original illustrator of his time. To the general public, as represented by the popular press, he was known as the ‘Gadget King’, that is as the inventor of perversely logical contraptions that gently mocked the products of the industrial age and so endeared society to its own rapid rate of change. He exploited this persona, by appearing on radio and television, designing a house for the Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition (1934), and parodying the self-help manual in a series of books which began with How to Live in a Flat (written with K R G Browne, 1936). His major set of literary illustrations in this later period further blurred the distinction between fiction and reality: Norman Hunter’s The Incredible Adventures of Professor Branestawm (1933) concerned an amiable, eccentric inventor. The events of the Second World War, as experienced on both sides of the English Channel, enabled him to sustain his powers of invention even into his final work. He died in Highgate, North London, on 13 September 1944.

His work is represented in the collections of the British Museum, The Cartoon Museum, the V&A and The West House and Heath Robinson Museum Trust.

Further reading:
Geoffrey Beare, The Art of William Heath Robinson , London: Dulwich Picture Gallery, 2003; Geoffrey Beare, The Brothers Robinson , London: Chris Beetles Ltd, 1992; Geoffrey Beare, Heath Robinson Advertising , London: Bellew, 1992; Geoffrey Beare, The Illustrations of W Heath Robinson , London: Werner Shaw, 1983; Geoffrey Beare, William Heath Robinson 1872-1944 , London: Chris Beetles Ltd, 2011; Langston Day, The Life and Art of W Heath Robinson , London: Herbert Joseph, 1947; James Hamilton, William Heath Robinson , London: Pavilion Books, 1992; Simon Heneage, ‘Robinson, William Heath (1872-1944)’, H C G Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography , Oxford University Press, 2004, vol 47, pages 428-431;John Lewis, Heath Robinson. Artist and Comic Genius , London: Constable, 1973

Oh, oh, oh!
Yeah, yeah, yeah!

Oh, oh, oh!
Yeah, yeah, yeah!

What a world, what a place to be
See the people everywhere
The pain of nations -
I tell you
Mother earth needs the help
Of all the children of the world
A revolution

Here we go -
Hear me say:
It's revolution in paradise;
Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah):
It's revolution in paradise!

What a world, what a place to be
So many people in misery
So much pain, so much poverty
We all should be free
See the beauty is everywhere
Mother earth, you must take more care
We all live in a paradise
We must treat her right

Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah):
It's revolution in paradise;
Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah)
It's revolution in paradise!

Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah):
It's revolution in paradise;
Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah)
It's revolution in paradise!

Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah):
It's revolution in paradise;
Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah)
It's revolution in paradise!

Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah):
It's revolution in paradise;
Here we go (oh, oh, oh) -
Hear me say (yeah, yeah, yeah)
It's revolution in paradise!

Love is the answer

The Broughton Arms is situated in a beautiful location, take a seat outside and enjoy the tranquil view of the Trent and Mersey Canal, popular with boaters and walkers. We’re a traditional family friendly pub at heart, offering a great menu containing all your favourite pub grub. You can’t beat a good fish and chips, our Hand-Battered Cod & Chips is battered using our ale of the day. If you don’t fancy fish we’ve got plenty more classics to choose from. Come down and relax by the canal on a nice sunny day whilst enjoying a pint of cask ale, a glass of wine or one of our soft drinks. We look forward to welcoming you soon.

Heath is a graduate of the London School of Contemporary Dance and the London Studio Centre of Dance and Drama.  Heath is a master in translating music into dance and passion; you will feel the music as you dance through brilliantly created choreographies that are intriguing yet easy to follow.  Silicon Valley companies have turned to Heath to choreograph flashmobs to uniquely  market their products and high profile events including the Goldman Prize , the San Francisco Ballet Gala , Uber , the Actian Hadoop Conference in New York and San Jose Berkeley Rep Opening Galas 2014&2015.   TEDSummit 2016,  LinkedIn  2016,  Weis Foundation for Children 2015, 2016, 2017


Heath Hunter & The Pleasure Company - MamboHeath Hunter & The Pleasure Company - MamboHeath Hunter & The Pleasure Company - MamboHeath Hunter & The Pleasure Company - Mambo

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